Boinkie's Blog

Universalis

Friday, March 30, 2012

Book marked for later reading

Mom decides she doesn't want to be a parent.

This morning’s TODAY Show featured a segment on a woman who chose to leave her husband and two young sons (ages 3 and 5 at the time) while on an extended research trip to Japan because she realized she didn’t want to be a mom anymore leaves my chest tight and my gut aching. Photos show her boys as pre-school-age angels. I want to hug and kiss them as my own.

Now, Rahna Reiko Rizzuto’s memoir Hiroshima in the Morning has been named a finalist for a National Book Award. My initial reaction: Really? She’s being celebrated for this? I could weep.Reiko Rizzuto speaks of her struggles to stay true to herself and admits that she had never wanted children (which begs the question why she had two). “I didn’t want to be swallowed up,” she says on the TODAY Show interview.

Some ten years later, she lives down the street from her family, sharing custody with her ex-husband and co-parenting her now teenage sons. While the set-up of this story positions her as a terrible, selfish mother who abandons her children to a loving and caring father, it’s not clear if she remained involved in their lives then as she is now. If so, how is this so different for the kids as a common divorce? Yes, divorce is a break up of a marriage, and in this case she broke up with her family and relinquished primary custody, but were these children really any worse off living primarily (or entirely – it’s not clear) with their father?
Plus: 31 Reasons You Shouldn’t Feel Mom Guilt

If you no longer want to be a mom, and you have another parent able to take care of your children, could you ever be justified in walking away? Would we be having this discussion if she were a man who’d left his wife and children? Watch the segment and decide for yourself.

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Norwich University, a military school, holds it's first gay pride week

many alumni are expected to return to campus, said club president and Norwich senior Joshua Fontanez, 22, of Browns Mills, N.J.

"They are truly saying, 'We're proud to come back home. This is something we wish that happened when we were here,'" he said.

The gay pride week, kicking off Monday, will feature six days of events — one for each color of the LGBT flag — with lectures and presentations on topics as varied as workshops on bias, harassment and bullying, to HIV testing to the Condom Olympics.



uh, gay pride is not about being able to live with someone you love in a monogamous and responsible relationship, but about condoms and HIV testings?

There are videos about condom olympics, but here is a how to article:

Set up the first half of the program as a team sexual jeopardy. Ask questions about any and everything. Use any resources available to make up your questions. Instead of awarding points and finding a winner, give condoms for every correct answer. The second half of the program is a condom relay race. Events such as "putting a condom on a cucumber" points are awarded to whoever finishes the event first and correctly. Other events are a condom tug of war between the partners, who can blow the condom up the biggest, or whatever else . . .
ALSO, if you can get different kinds of condoms see which ones hold up the best when filled with marbles and such.

When you run out of condoms, you're done playing, so don't allow everyone to participate in every event.

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furthur down, another variation included dental dams.


Instructions/Things Needed:

Condoms, dental dams (I found this for free at the local planned parenthood, oranges, measuring tape (condom stretch), judges, prizes, lubricant (we ended by having a group hand orgy), cucumbers, facts on STD's and safe sex (we gave a few facts between each event), we also demonstrated how to correctly put on a condom, glow in the dark condoms, pens and paper.


then there is the first annual Harvard sex week

Harvard’s first-ever Sex Week, which aims to promote thoughtful discourse on issues of sex and sexuality through education, conversation, and vagina-themed cupcakes, kicked off Sunday with a presentation by Megan Andelloux, a certified sexuality educator and sexologist.

The weeklong event, organized by the Sexual Health Education and Advocacy Throughout Harvard College, features speakers, seminars, and movies that explore topics such as love, sex, sexuality, gender, gender identity, and relationships...“Sex Week connects people while demonstrating and continually reflecting that people are different,” she said. “Sex Week builds community in this very strong way in which you are engaging with something that is personal in an http://www.blogger.com/img/blank.gifintellectual, deep, and rigorous way.”...
Throughout the week, a SHEATH table on the Science Center lawn will feature free safer sex supplies, educational materials, and activities. Representatives from partner organizations including peer-counseling groups will be on site to answer questions.


Catholic student group leaves Vanderbuilt Univ
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Is Vanderbilt University waging a war on religion?

Many of the university’s religious student groups think so. They have been told by the administration that they cannot have faith or belief-based requirements for leadership. That means an atheist could run for leadership of a Christian group, a Jew for leadership of a Muslim group, a Pagan for leadership of a Catholic group, and on and on.

It’s all written into Vanderbilt’s nondiscrimination or “all-comers” policy.

All student groups must register next month. As part of the registration, they must sign a statement of affirmation that they will abide by the nondiscrimination policy.

Vandy Catholic -- a student group with some 500 members -- has decided it cannot agree to the policy and will be leaving campus in the fall. PJ Jedlovec, the president of Vandy Catholic, says it was a difficult decision, one made after much prayer and discussion.

“We are first and foremost a Catholic organization," says Jedlovec. “We do, in fact, have qualifications – faith-based qualifications for leadership. We require that our leaders be practicing Catholics. And the university’s nondiscrimination policy -- they have made it clear that there is no room in it for an organization that has these faith-based qualifications.”

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